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Archive for the ‘Victorian Period’ Category

This Scientific American edition covers the 1900 Paris Exposition. On the front, there are photos of “The Large Palace of Fine Arts,” the “Small Palace of Fine Arts,” the “Moving Platform,” the “Electric Railway and End of Electricity Building,” and the “Street of Nations” on the Bank of the Seine.

1900 SciAm Paris Exposition

There is an article entitled “The Protection of American Game” which talks about The League of American Sportsmen which was formed to create “in every State and Territory a well organized standing army of game protectors, which shall secure the enactment of more stringent general laws, which shall see that lawlessness is punished, which shall discourage game slaughter, and protect the wild creatures that still remain.”

An extensive description of the Paris Exposition starts on page 86, where the publishers discuss the electric railway:

The electric railway is intended to enable visitors to move in an opposite direction to the sliding platform, three cars capable of conveying about two hundred persons forming the train, and electricity is delivered to the motors by means of a third-rail. The trains follow each other at intervals of two minutes. The circuit is completed in about twelve minutes, including stoppages.

Further in the edition, there is an article about Count Zeppelin’s balloon entitled, ”The Ascension of Count Zeppelin’s Airship.”

The second day of July will long be remembered by aeronauts, for on that day occurred the first ascension of the great airship just completed by Count Zeppelin, the cavalry officer of Wurtemberg, who has so long been superintending the construction of his balloon in a huge floating house on Lake Constance, a site admirably adapted for work of this kind, as it offers ample space and in case of accident the results are likely to be much less disastrous than on land. … The Zeppelin airship belongs to the class of so-called aerostatic balloons or dirigible airships which hold a middle ground between the purely dynamic flying machines and the manually-operated devices, resembling in this respect what are known as “balloon flying machines;” that is, those airships in which hydrogen is used only for keeping the apparatus suspended, which the mechanical power is employed for driving and steering it.

There are some wonderful engravings which accompany this article.

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In addition, the ads on the back page are noteworthy and interesting. Here are some examples of competition in the early automobile industry – hydrocarbon system for the Winton Motor Carriage and steam for the Standard Model Steam Carriage.

Winton Motor Carriage

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“For Your Wife’s Sake be in the social swim and get the best of the modern conveyances a Winton Motor Carriage. No horse or coachman required. No danger, no hard work. $1,200.”

 

 

The Standard Model – Steam Carriage

“Extra large boiler and engine. We do away with torch, and light with direct burner, furnish a supplementary water pump, also coil water heater from exhaust steam.”1900 SciAm For Your Wife's Sake

Have your own automobile design? Contact the “Automobile Patents Exploitation Company” which undertakes “The manufacture of Automobiles and Motor-Cycles. The examination of Automobile patents. To enlist capital for the development of inventions.”

This and other original Victorian Era newspapers are available for purchase at Steam at Harper’s Ferry. Contact us for purchase price and delivery options.

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One of many reasons why Steam at Harper’s Ferry opened was to offer an opportunity to learn about Harper’s Ferry in all its historic glory. Steam sells many historic newspapers from the Victorian Period, but the one especially loved is The Ladies’ Garland, published by John S. Gallagher. One recent acquisition is dated October 21, 1826, volume 3, no. 37.

Ladies Garland October 21, 1826

This particular edition contains an article on Female Education, reprinted from the Edinburg Review. Here is a sample:

“A great part of the objections made to the education of women, are rather objections made to human nature, than to the female sex ; for it is surely true, that knowledge, where it does produce any bad effects at all, does as much mischief to the one sex as to the other, and gives birth to fully as much arrogance, inattention to common affairs, and eccentricity among men, as it does among women. – But it by no means follows, that you get rid of vanity and self-conceit, because you get rid of learning. Self-complacency can never want an excuse ; and the best way to make it more tolerable, and more useful, is to give to it as high and as dignified an object as possible. But at all events, it is unfair, to bring forward against a part of the world, an objection which is equally powerful against the whole. When foolish women think they have any distinction, they are apt to be proud of it ; so are foolish men. But we appeal to any one who has lived with cultivated persons of either sex, whether he has not witnessed as much pendantry, as much wrong-headedness, as much arrogance, and certainly a great deal more rudeness, produced by learning, in men, than in women.  …

We are quite astonished on hearing men converse on such subjects, to find them attributing such beautiful effects to ignorance. It would appear from the tenor of such objections, that ignorance has been the greatest civilizer in the world. Women are delicate and refined, only because they are ignorant ; they attend to their children, only because they know no better ! Now, we must really confess we have all our lives been so ignorant as not to know the value of ignorance !  … Let any man reflect too upon the solitary situation in which women are placed, the ill treatment to which they are sometimes exposed, and which they must endure in silence, and without the power of complaining – and he must feel convinced, that the happiness of a woman will be materially increased, in proportion as education has given to her the habit and means of drawing her resources from herself.”

Purchase this and other limited editions of The Ladies’ Garland at Steam at Harper’s Ferry.

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Steam at Harper’s Ferry prides itself in its original newspaper collection, which includes titles such as Scientific American, Harper’s Weekly, Frank Leslie’s Illustrated and The New York Herald. Perhaps some will appeal to historians you know as you consider Christmas gifts! Here are some samples.

Harper’s WEEKLY, New York, November 26, 1859 (only 1)

Frontpage illustrations from Wilkie Collins’ “The Woman in White.”  Interior and backpage sketches by Porte Crayon about the “late outbreak.” Doublepage centerfold illustrations “Fall Games” being “The Elephant” and “The Apple-bee” The issue is complete in 16 pages, in good condition, containing additional illustrations and text.

En Route to Harpers Ferry Nov 26 1859

$41.95 plus shipping and handling.

Frank Leslie’s ILLUSTRATED Newspaper, December 17, 1864 (only 1)

Frontpage full-page illustration of Consecration of the Roman Catholic Cathedral at Philadelphia. Doublepage centerfold illustrations “The Hotels of New York City that were set on Fire by Rebel Incendiaries on the Evening of November 25.” Including the Tamany Hotel, Barnum’s American Museum, Lovejoy’s Hotel, St. Nicholas Hotel. The issue is complete in 16 pages, in good condition (some earmarks), containing additional illustrations and text.

 

$31.95 plus shipping and handling

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Call to Artists – Exhibit “Travels in Time” – Submissions due September 3

Steam at Harper’s Ferry announces a call to all artists to submit work for selection for its next exhibit “Travels in Time” in Harper’s Ferry, West Virginia September 21 – November 17, 2013. Artists are requested to submit work related to the H.G. Wells book, “The Time Machine,” ideally with a steampunk twist, by September 3, 2013. Artists may submit up to 3 works for selection. There will be a $30 administration and promotion fee if selected.

Around the World – June 29 – August 25, 2013 – FINAL WEEKS!

The “Around the World” exhibit opened on June 29 and continues through August 25. This exhibit features the work of John Hoffmaster (illustration, “Still Waters”); Leigh Anne Cassell (illustration, “Legs that Can Can”); and Jason Edwards (painting, “Captain Tomorrow” and “Captain Tomorrow gives chase in his red balloon”).

 

What’s New at Steam

Cynthia Gayton will be making a steampunk in literature presentation at the Bolivar-Harper’s Ferry Public Library on August 15 at 6 pm. In addition to discussing steampunk-themed books available at the library and elsewhere, she will talk briefly about Victorian-era inventors from Harper’s Ferry. The library, in its awesomeness, will have refreshments! Steam will also have a few 3D art pieces on display.

Steam has released another publication under its SciFi/Steampunk imprint, Steam at Harper’s Ferry Press, entitled “Guide to Creating and Protecting Fictional Characters.” This Guide, as well as the story “Of Steam and Spring” are available for sale at the Gallery as well as at Amazon.com in a Kindle version.

Artomatic in Jefferson County – October 2013 – REGISTRATION CLOSES AUGUST 12!

Artist registration for Artomatic@Jefferson began on June and ends August 12. Registration fees may be waived if you are a full-time student. Student registration has been extended to September.  Contact Cynthia if you have an idea for an art demonstration or artist-focused education program. Please see their website for details: http://artomaticjefferson.com/.

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Around the World – Next Exhibit

Watch this space! The next exhibit at Steam will have an “Around the World in 80 Days” theme. A “Call to Artists” will be posted soon.

What’s New at Steam

Steam’s next installment “Of Steam and Spring” under its new SciFi/Steampunk imprint, Steam at Harper’s Ferry Press, was released on April 27. Here is an excerpt:

“A full moon rose between the mountains. Its light reflected from the Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers at The Point. A crowd gathered on the Hill Top House veranda, bundled in furs, scarves, gloves and hats even though it was early Spring. … The chimes at St. Peter’s Church rang out at midnight, just as the moon completed a triangle above the uneven peaks. … Lights flickered into being on the newly installed carousel which began to turn. A song began to play on the calliope. Its mournful noise was in sharp contrast to the joyful tunes with which people were familiar who visited the Park.”

The Steampunk World’s Fair is this month, from May 17 – 19, 2013. Cynthia M. Gayton is scheduled to speak about protecting literary and illustrated characters on Sunday, May 19 from 1:15 – 2:15 at The Radisson in Boardroom A. Looking forward to it!

Big Top Steam – Exhibit Ended

The Big Top Steam exhibit ended this past weekend. The artists are Leigh Anne Cassell and Lindsey Donaldson. In addition, there are  two special installations by Eric Holstine and Phil Berneburg. This was one of the most ambitious and varied exhibit Steam has had to date. Thanks everyone for taking the time to view this wonderful collection!

Bolivar-Harpers Ferry Community Art Walk – April  27 and 28, 2013 – A Success!

At final count, there were over 50 artists at 21 venues participating in the Bolivar-Harper’s Ferry Community Art Walk over this past weekend. Despite the rain on Sunday, about 150 people received commemorative goodie bags and letterpress prints, along with coupons and gifts from local merchants. The Hill Top House was especially gorgeous on April 27. The grounds were decorated with flowering plants and freshly mulched. Special thanks goes out to the volunteers, Kenzie Allen, Teresa Barth, and Jason Edwards. If you attended, thanks for coming! If not, please come next time!

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Of Steam and Spring CoverOn Thursday, April 26, 2013, Steam announced the release of the next publication from our Steam at Harper’s Ferry Press imprint, “Of Steam and Spring” by V. Edwards Clarke with illustrations by Kasey Hendricks. Here is an excerpt from the story:

“A full moon rose between the mountains. Its light reflected from the Shenandoah and Potomac Rivers at The Point. A crowd gathered on the Hill Top House veranda, bundled in furs, scarves, gloves and hats even though it was early Spring. … The chimes at St. Peter’s Church rang out at midnight, just as the moon completed a triangle above the uneven peaks. … The din started like a train whistle sounding through a tunnel. It grew louder and louder until its clamor blasted forth, powerful enough to awaken the ancient mountains. Lights flickered into being on the newly installed carousel which began to turn. A song began to play on the calliope. Its mournful noise was in sharp contrast to the joyful tunes with which people were familiar who visited the Park.”

There was a full moon on April 26 and for most of this weekend, I spent my time at the Hill Top House overlook handing out maps, flyers and coupons for the Second Annual Bolivar-Harper’s Ferry Community Art Walk and heard a train thunder through the tunnel more than a dozen times. But, there is no longer any carousel or calliope. Coincidence?

This story is about an enchantment of the Island Park’s carousel during the lifetime of Hill Top House’s original owner, Thomas Lovett. A Calliope Romance brought to you by Steam at Harper’s Ferry.

Limited physical copies are available for purchase at Steam at Harper’s Ferry. Please email Steam if you would like a copy mailed to you. An e-book version will be available soon.

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As I prepare for the Second Annual Bolivar-Harper’s Ferry Art Walk on April 27 & 28, I reflect on Steam at Harper’s Ferry’s most popular in-house prints. The Steampunk Leisure exhibit (September 22 – November 18, 2012) featuring the art work of Teresa Dunham Cavagnaro and Nancy Kautz, also featured a series of Victorian era velocipedes – in 3D!

Look out for our Steam’s Got Tech postcard series in the Gallery – the second one is shown below.

Unicycle_Number_09_2x3_Web_Card_Cobolt_Blue

The unicycle depicted here represents one of our most popular prints – and you can purchase a print to be delivered directly to your home here.

 

 

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The Big Top Steam exhibit opens this Saturday, February 23. Big Top Steam’s featured artists are Leigh Anne Cassell and Lindsey Donaldson. There will be special installations by two additional artists, Eric Holstine and Phil Berneburg.

This show will be a first for Steam at Harper’s Ferry – all of the artists live or work in West Virginia! Two artists (Leigh Anne and Lindsey) are from Charles Town, one artist is from Charleston (Eric Holstine) and another has a studio in Bolivar (Phil Berneburg).

Come One! Come All! Step Right Up!

The Show is About to Begin!

Girl on Horseback1909 Harpers Weekly

Girl on Horseback
1909 Harpers Weekly

Leigh Anne Cassell

This is the second show in which Leigh Anne has participated. The following is an excerpt from her original artist statement from the “Gadgets, Guns & Gears” opening in 2012.

“As an artist, one of my personal goals with my work is to strengthen my talent with drawing portraits, especially with the use of color, while also trying more stylized approaches. Since I started drawing portraits in high school I have come to greatly love the technicality of capturing the realism of people’s faces with a pencil. Recently I have expanded my medium to inks and colored pencils. It took me so long to try using color because I did not think that I had the skills to draw with it. One day I just decided to try it, and I ended up surprising myself. Even though I think I still need lots of practice with it, I am happy that I am working well enough with color at the moment. I have been asked in the past why I do not try more digital media to create drawings. I have never had interest in trying a tablet or any other form of digital process to draw. I am in no way against these technological advancements or works of art created by them; I just personally like to sit down with my drawing board, paper, pens, and pencils and just draw. I like the sound and feel of pencils as they move over paper. I can easily say that I do not fit in very well with the more “modern” art world, but I am perfectly fine with that.”

"The Little Jester" (c) 2013 Leigh Anne Cassell (with permission)

“The Little Jester”
(c) 2013 Leigh Anne Cassell (with permission)

Lindsey Donaldson

“I have always had an interest in art but have never had any formal training.  I gained what little prowess I have by constantly doodling, drawing, and sketching. Several broken pencils later, I emerged with a preference in traditional media, mostly graphite and ink, but have started to expand into digital media. I’d like to become more proficient in digital media because it eliminates the boundaries of traditional media.  Since I’ve never been able to spend a lot on art supplies, digital media gives me access to all sorts of things I wouldn’t be able to get normally. I have always preferred working in a more illustrative style because it offers a different sence of control and creativity that I appreciate more than realism.  People have always been my subject of choice ever since childhood.  Real or imagined, mostly imagined, the human form has always facinated me and taking the faces out of my mind and putting them onto paper is one of life’s little joys for me.”

"The Bearded Lady" (c) Lindsey Donaldson (with permission)

“The Bearded Lady”
(c) Lindsey Donaldson (with permission)

Eric Holstine

“I have worked in a variety of mediums.  Most of my work also incorporates my professional life, which is in Information Technology, as well as electrical features.”

Steampunk floor lamp (c) 2013 Eric Holstine (with permission)

Steampunk floor lamp
(c) 2013 Eric Holstine (with permission)

Phil Berneburg

“My interests lie in creating sculptural work (both functional and nonfunctional) and in contributing to education in the ceramic arts. I consider myself very fortunate to have had the opportunity to gain experience in both the technical and creative aspects of ceramics. My approach to pottery is very experiment-oriented. I explore a lot of ideas and try a lot of techniques; I learn a lot, but I produce relatively little. Not every idea is turned into a finished piece.  The current work is part of my “Steam-Pfunktional” series of Steampunk-inspired  pseudo-functional ceramic pieces. Steampunk, the art of Victorian futurism or science fiction with the celebration of Victorian technology and aesthetics and the rejection of the evils resulting from the Industrial Revolution, has existed ever since the novels of H. G. Wells and Jules Verne, but has only recently coalesced from a term referring only to a type of science fiction novel into a broader art movement.”

"High Pressure Brewing Vessel" (c) 2012 Phil Berneburg (with permission)

“High Pressure Brewing Vessel”
(c) 2012 Phil Berneburg (with permission)

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Hill Top House under the Moonlight

Hill Top House under the Moonlight

That’s right! The Hill Top House is allowing Art Walk participants to set up easels and tripods at the Overlook.

For those of you not familiar with the Historic Hill Top House, you can see it in the postcard image above to the left of the moon. For many years, Hill Top House held an arts and crafts show at Christmastime, so participation in this event continues a long tradition and connection between the arts and Hill Top House. As you can tell, I am super excited!

Mr. Kevin Leary, who will be on the premises, asks that people clean up after themselves and watch their personal possessions. There are some restricted areas for safety reasons, so please respect the signs.

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Big Top Steam – Call to Artists – Deadline February 1Female Acrobats

Big Top Steam is coming to the Gallery!  We have posted a call to artists for this next exhibit. The deadline is February 1. The first day of the exhibit is February 23.  Please check the website for further information.

Big Top Steam – Exhibit February 23 through April 28

On February 8, the artists for this exhibit will be announced.

Shameless Steam – March

The next Shameless Steam arts-related business series will be held in March. If you are interested in promoting your arts-related business or your own work, please see the website under the post “Call for Presentations!” or follow the links under the “Events” tab.

Bolivar-Harpers Ferry Community Art Walk – April  27 and 28, 2013

So far, there are thirteen participating venues for this event! We are currently working with Hill Top House owner, SWaN Investors, which has tentatively agreed to make its overlook available for the Art Walk. So far, the participating venues are (from Bolivar to Lower Town): Bolivar-Harpers Ferry Public Library, Teahorse B&B/Hostel, The Gilded Flea, Appalachian Trail Conservancy, (fingers crossed Hill Top House!), The Vintage Lady, The Village Shop, Steam at Harper’s Ferry, Tenfold Fair Trade, Mary Adams, Scoops, Westwind Potters, True Treats, and the Harpers Ferry National Park Bookshop. If you are interested to have work shown at your business or if you are an artist who wants to have work shown at a business establishment along the walking tour route, please contact Steam at Harper’s Ferry.

February 2013

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